A Friend In Need (2)

A Friend In Need (2)

Tayo’s father knew me well. I frequented his house as his son’s best friend and, good enough, he approved of my friendship with his son. He once told me of how he had taken time to pray with Tayo about God choosing a friend for him. He was afraid that an ungodly influence could derail his beloved son and waste all the spiritual investments in him. My father was his assistant and he too was pleased with my friendship with Tayo.

Pastor Adekunle, Tayo’s father, treats me like a son—his son. On days when my parents travelled out of town on missionary assignment, I simply packed my things and went over to my friend’s house and could be there for as long as I wanted. So, by all means, I knew I could discuss with him as a father.

Without hesitation, I placed a call to him, which he answered almost immediately, “Hello, my son.”

“Sir, goo… good afternoon sir.” I stammered a reply. I realized I hadn’t thought it through before making the call.

“How are you? I’ve had it in mind to call you.” Call me? I wondered. Why would he want to call me? Does he know about Tayo’s recent change in behaviour? Has someone told him already? Is he angry that I didn’t tell him earlier?

“Really, sir?” I asked, leading him on.

“Yes. I noticed that you were not around during the last semester break. Is everything alright?”

“Yes sir,” I replied, feeling relieved. “I was busy with some pastoral work in the campus fellowship. I needed to wait behind with some other fellowship executives to seek God’s face in prayers and plan for the new session.”

“I see,” came his most common response. “Tayo told me of your involvement in the Lord’s work over there. I pray God will continue to strengthen you in Jesus’ name.”

“Amen. Thank you sir.”

“It’s good to hear from you.”

“Same here sir. Extend my greetings to the rest of the family sir,” I said curtly. I didn’t want the conversation to prolong anymore. Obviously, he didn’t know, and I wasn’t ready to be the one to bell the cat at the moment. Tayo deserved a fair hearing after all, and although I’d tried giving him that, I was going to try again.

“Alright, my son. Bye.”

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“Goodbye sir.”

Heaving a big sigh of relief, I wasn’t sure what to do next. After racking my brain for minutes, I resolved that I needed to approach the matter radically. Next thing I did was to take a stool and a copy of Robert Liardon’s ‘God’s Generals’, and go straight to Tayo’s room.

The music was playing as usual, but I tried getting his attention all the same. At first, I called his phone which he didn’t answer. Of course, I knew he wouldn’t answer no matter how many times I called, so I started calling his name, then proceeded to knocking. After knocking for minutes without any response, I said to myself, ‘Well, today is the day! It is either he comes out to see me, or he stays in that room for the rest of the day.’ It was a Saturday morning and I had a few hours to spare, so I took my sit in front of his door, reading.

Tayo must have felt that I would leave soon since that was not the first time. He even increased the volume of the music from his room, yet I was still determined to wait. Something was not right and I was about to find out. I busied myself with the book in my hand silently praying that someday I would be one of God’s generals too. It was hard to concentrate but, at least, it kept me busy.

After about two and half hours, I heard Tayo turn down the music and unbolt the door from within. Then, he turned the lock and opened the door gently as if he was hiding from being caught. After peeping outside to ascertain that I was alone, he beckoned to me to come inside.

To be continued…

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1 Comment

  1. Pingback: A Friend in Need (30) | John Ogunjimi's Blog

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